Book of revelation dating

It is claimed that Revelation must have been penned before A. 70 since it has no allusion to the destruction of Jerusalem; rather, it is alleged, it represents both the city and the temple as still standing. Second, the contention that the literal city and temple were still standing, based upon chapter eleven, ignores the express symbolic nature of the narrative.

Salmon says that it is: difficult to understand how anyone could have imagined that the vision represents the temple as still standing.

The spiritual conditions of the churches described in Revelation chapters two and three more readily harmonize with the late date.

The church in Ephesus, for instance, was not founded by Paul until the latter part of Claudius’s reign: and when he wrote to them from Rome, A. 61, instead of reproving them for any want of love, he commends their love and faith (Eph. Yet, when Revelation was written, in spite of the fact that the Ephesians had been patient (2:2), they had also left their first love (v.

Some writers, however, have advanced the preterist (from a Latin word meaning “that which is past”) view, contending that the Apocalypse was penned around A. 68 or 69, and thus the thrust of the book is supposed to relate to the impending destruction of Jerusalem (A. Wallace Jr.), and for a brief time it was popular with certain scholars. In fact, the evidence for the later date is extremely strong.

The Book of Revelation, full of complex imagery and vivid depictions of violence, outlines God’s plan for the Second Coming of Christ and the punishment of Satan in a lake of fire.One said there are “as many riddles as there are words” in Revelation.Unlike other books in the New Testament, it is a work of prophecy, talking primarily about future events.There he saw the Apocalypse; and when at length grown old, he thought that he should receive his release by suffering; but Domitian being killed, he was liberated (.18).Mc Clintock and Strong, in contending for the later date, declare that “there is no mention in any writer of the first three centuries of any other time or place” (1969, 1064).

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