Ground rules for dating asian women

And so it goes, in France, Germany, Bermuda, and all over the world.

Or to put it another way, everybody thinks it’s easy for the other person. Well, I don’t really either, but I imagine it’s that thing where if I say, “Japanese people are shy,” then you start noticing all the ways in which they’re shy. Basically about 99 percent of what’s written about Japan is just regurgitating some myth that somebody else said. It’s not that 100% of the people got lucky; it’s that you’re the only one who stayed around gawking. So I didn’t entirely relish wading into all this, but then Jasmine threw out a leading question I couldn’t resist: For one, I thought it was a strange question, partly because of the word “get,” which sounds like you’re going fishing for Japanese people. For another, I felt the real question was, “Is it easier to date in Japan than it is anywhere else?

And if it sounds a bit like I’m down on Japanese women, that’s not the case.

What I’m not so cool with is repeating the same unfounded information about Japan. Anyway, if you’ve made it through this lengthy preface, then go check out the full article in all its glory, and let me know what you think.

Deeply set, bright, shaded with long lashes, infinitely seductive. Contrary to the typical Western view, we don’t find high cheekbones very attractive.

Or what do you love about the special Western woman in your life? You don’t have to have a Top 10 — it could be even one, two or three things.

But actually, mine hasn’t really been all that troubling after we married, which is kind of a miracle! presentable), and go into the kitchen.” While this might sound kind of old-fashioned, I’ll still take the compliment!

I know, I know — one of my most popular posts talks about the troubling Chinese mother-in-law relationship. John actually expressed this with a Chinese saying: shàng dé liao tīngtáng, xià dé liao chúfáng (上得了厅堂,下得了厨房), or someone who can “meet guests (i.e. When I returned to China for the second time in 2001 (after a year of teaching English from 1999 to 2000), I actually went alone — something that led my husband to privately dub me a “hero” (which is kind of funny to me! And while I know it sure doesn’t rank highest on the courage-meter, it’s definitely a sweet thing to appreciate.

Like if I said, “Japanese architecture is stunning,” somebody’d stand up and complain that the cities are just jumbled amalgamations of aging concrete projects.

(Now cue mad comments like “Well, I got laid in Tokyo last night.”) A lot of dudes who’ve been here for years gripe about the exact opposite.

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